Classic Apple Crisp (Recipe + Video)


I’m singing all the praises of apple crisp because it’s THE dessert of the season. Featuring warm gooey cinnamon apples and a brown sugar oat topping, this comfort food classic takes half the time and effort of traditional apple pie. You only need a handful of basic ingredients to get started.

apple crisp in white baking dish

How many ways can we bake with apples? Hopefully you’ve been enjoying sweet and simple baked apples this fall season or even dove headfirst into caramel apple upside down cake last week. There’s apple cinnamon babka (best thing I’ve baked all year), deep dish apple pie, and so many more apple recipes. Hard to keep track!

But today I want to get down to the basics. This is pure and simple apple crisp, a timeless dessert highlighting the natural flavor of apples. An end-of-the-meal treat that delivers BIG flavor for very little work. Let’s be honest– if you can chop apples, you can make apple crisp.

spoonful of apple crisp

Apple Crisp Video Tutorial


Why Make Apple Crisp?

  1. Easier Than Pie: I adore you apple pie, but you’re a labor of love. Here we’re swapping pie crust for oat streusel topping. Skip all the pie dough chilling and leave your rolling pin in the cabinet.
  2. Basic Ingredients: Crisps are pretty unfussy– there’s no strange ingredients required. Most of them are repeated in both layers too.
  3. No Eggs: Many bakers have been asking for egg-free baking recipes like this.
  4. Short Cooling Time: As much as I love homemade pie, it comes with a long cooling time. Sometimes we need something a little quicker, but just as seasonal and impressive.
  5. And It’s Delicious: What’s better than warm cinnamon apples and chewy-crisp oat topping? This is a cold weather must.

Above all else– if you have little ones, this dessert is convenient and manageable. With a toddler and infant, I’m a tired mama who can speak from experience! You don’t have to wait for anything to come to room temperature, chill, or cool down. My daughter had a ball spreading the apples into the dish and sprinkling the oat crumble on top.

apple crisp in white baking dish

Overview of Apple Crisp Ingredients

  1. Apples: See below for the best apples to use. You need about 8 medium apples, peeled and chopped into chunks.
  2. Brown Sugar: We use brown sugar to sweeten and bring flavor to the entire dish. You need it for both the apple layer and topping.
  3. Flour: All-purpose flour thickens the apple filling and is the base of the topping. Do you need a gluten free version? Here’s my super flavorful gluten free apple crisp.
  4. Vanilla & Salt: I’ve made a lot of apple crisp recipes and nothing compares to the way I make it now (recipe below). Vanilla adds something special and salt balances out all the sweetness. Trust me, you don’t want to skip either– I find it tastes flat otherwise.
  5. Cinnamon & Nutmeg: Obvious suspects. Use cinnamon and nutmeg in the apple layer and cinnamon again in the topping.
  6. Butter: To prevent it from melting too soon and losing texture, use very cold butter. Take it right from the refrigerator and cut it into cubes. Then use a pastry cutter or fork to mix it into the flour, brown sugar, and cinnamon. Don’t overcomplicate this step, let the mixture be messy, crumbly, and coarse. Less is more. (Music to our ears!)
  7. Oats: Best part of the topping. Some oats get a little crispy, some stay soft and chewy. Use whole oats for the best texture. Stir the oats into the topping mixture *after* you cut in the butter. You don’t want them to break down too much.

The topping is the same recipe we use for blueberry crumble pie and bourbon cherry crisp, only slightly increased for the larger dish. It’s what I use for cinnamon apple pear crisp, too.

chopped cinnamon apples for baking

topping for fruit crisp

apple crisp before baking

Can I Make Apple Crisp Without Oats?

Yes, absolutely. To make apple crisp without oats, we’ll use the topping from apple crumble pie, only slightly increased. Use 3/4 cup (150g) brown sugar, 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1 cup (125g) all-purpose flour, and 1/2 cup (115g) unsalted butter, melted and slightly cooled. Mix the brown sugar, cinnamon, and flour together. Using a fork, stir in the cooled melted butter until the mixture is thick and crumbly. Don’t over-mix– it will become a paste if you over-mix. Same oven temperature and bake time as below. I prefer melted butter to keep the crumble topping on the softer side. If you want a crispy crumble topping, use cold butter and cut it into the mixture just as you do in the recipe below.

  • Feel free to add 1 cup of chopped pecans or walnuts. Add with the flour.

Or you can turn this into an apple cobbler. Cobblers are usually topped with a biscuit or cake-like topping instead of an oat topping. Use the same apple filling and oven temperature in the recipe below, but use the topping and bake time from my berry cobbler instead.

One thing you can’t change? Vanilla ice cream. It’s an apple crisp non-negotiable. Plus a drizzle of salted caramel for good measure. Best fall dessert around.

serving of apple crisp with vanilla ice cream and caramel

What Are the Best Apples to Use for Baking?

Firmer apples are ideal for baking. Avoid soft, mealy, and mushy apples. For depth of flavor, it’s best to bake with a mix of tart and sweet apples. For apple crisp, I usually use 4 tart and 4 sweet.

  • Tart apples I love to bake with: Granny Smith (in my opinion, this is the best overall apple for baking), Braeburn, Jonathan, and Pacific Rose
  • Sweet apples I love to bake with: Jazz, Honeycrisp, Pink Lady, and Fuji

Print

clock clock icon cutlery cutlery icon flag flag icon folder folder icon instagram instagram icon pinterest pinterest icon print print icon squares squares icon


Description

This classic apple crisp combines warm gooey cinnamon apples with a buttery brown sugar oat topping. See recipe notes for make ahead & freezing instructions.


Ingredients

  • 78 medium apples, cut into 1-inch chunks (about 10 cups chunks)
  • 1/2 cup (100g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup (31g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Topping

  • 3/4 cup (95g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 3/4 cup (150g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick; 115g) unsalted butter, cold and cubed
  • 1 cup (80g) old-fashioned whole oats
  • optional: salted caramel and vanilla ice cream for serving

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C). Lightly grease a 9×13 inch baking pan. Any 4 quart baking dish works.
  2. Mix all of the filling ingredients together in a large bowl, then spread into the baking pan.
  3. Make the topping: Whisk the flour, brown sugar, and cinnamon together in a medium bowl. Cut in the butter using a pastry cutter or fork until the mixture becomes super crumbly. Stir in the oats. Sprinkle over filling.
  4. Bake for 45 minutes or until the topping is golden brown and the fruit juices are bubbling around the edges. Remove from the oven, place on a wire rack, and allow to cool for at least 5 minutes before serving. Serve warm, room temperature, or cold– plain or with salted caramel and/or vanilla ice cream.
  5. Cover leftovers and store in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead & Freezing Instructions: Baked and cooled crisp freezes well for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator, then bake (covered) in a 350°F (177°C) for 30 minutes or until heated through. You can prepare the crisp through step 3, then cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day before baking. You can also freeze the unbaked crisp for up to 3 months. Allow to thaw overnight in the refrigerator, then continue with step 4. Bake time will be a little longer since the crisp will be cold.
  2. Apples: See blog post above for the best apples to use. An equal mix of Granny Smith and Jazz or Pink Lady is my favorite for apple crisp.
  3. Oats: Whole oats are best, but you can use quick oats if you need to. The crumble topping will just be a little more powdery. (Don’t be tempted to reduce the flour, though– the topping may turn out greasy.) Use a 1:1 swap from whole oats to quick oats. For an oat-less topping, see blog post above.
  4. Nuts: Feel free to add 1 cup of chopped pecans or walnuts to the crisp topping. Stir into the mixture when you add the oats.
  5. Half Recipe: You can easily halve this recipe by halving all of the ingredients and baking in a 9-inch square or round baking dish. Reduce bake time to about 30-35 minutes.

Keywords: apple crisp, fruit crisp, apples



Source link

Homemade Potatoes Au Gratin – Budget Bytes


When you need pure comfort in a casserole dish, Potatoes Au Gratin deliver. These thinly sliced potatoes baked in a creamy, cheesy sauce hit all the comfort food buttons. And the leftovers are awesome, so you can feed on that casserole heaven all week! 🙌

Potatoes au Gratin being scooped out of the casserole dish

What are Potatoes Au Gratin?

Potatoes au gratin are basically scalloped potatoes with cheese (haha, that made me think of “royale with cheese”). So if you like scalloped potatoes and you like cheese, you’ll LOVE potatoes au gratin!

If you’ve never had scalloped potatoes, you can think of potatoes au gratin like this: thinly sliced potatoes layered with cheese and a creamy white sauce, then baked until bubbly and delicious. It’s pretty incredible.

What Kind of Cheese Can I Use?

In general, you want to stick to smooth melting cheeses for potatoes au gratin and avoid hard aged cheeses that don’t melt as easily (like Parmesan, although that would make a nice topper mixed with breadcrumbs!). I had some cheddar cheese on hand today, that I used, but Gruyere is another popular choice for potatoes au gratin.

What to Serve with Potatoes Au Gratin

This is such a rich comforting dish that it pairs well with any roasted or baked comfort food. I would pair it with something like Herb Roasted Pork Tenderloin, Cheddar Cheeseburger Meatloaf, or Herb Butter Chicken Thighs. And of course you’ll probably need some sort of vegetable to balance out all that richness, so add a simple side of steamed green beans for good measure. 😉

What Kind of Potatoes are Best?

Most people like a waxier variety for potatoes au gratin, like Yukon gold or red potatoes, but I’m the opposite. I like russet potatoes because they are starchier, which helps keep the sauce nice and thick, and I enjoy how soft they get when baked in the creamy sauce. If you prefer a more firm slice, go with Yukon gold or red potatoes.

Overhead view of casserole dish full of potatoes au gratin

Potatoes Au Gratin

Thinly sliced potatoes baked in a creamy, cheesy sauce makes these Potatoes Au Gratin pure heaven in a casserole dish.

Total Cost: $5.33 recipe / $0.67 serving

Author: Beth – Budget Bytes

Servings: 8

  • 3 lbs. potatoes ($1.79)
  • 1 yellow onion ($0.32)
  • 4 Tbsp butter ($0.56)
  • 4 Tbsp all-purpose flour ($0.04)
  • 1 cup chicken broth ($0.12)
  • 2 cups whole milk ($0.75)
  • 1/2 tsp salt ($0.02)
  • 1/4 tsp freshly cracked black pepper ($0.02)
  • 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg ($0.02)
  • 8 oz. cheddar, shredded ($1.69)
  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Peel and slice the potatoes into ⅛-inch thick slices. If you’re not yet confident in your knife skills, use a mandoline or food processor to slice the potatoes into thin, even pieces.

  • Finely dice the yellow onion. Sauté the onion in a sauce pot with the butter until soft (about five minutes). Once soft, add the flour to the pot and continue to cook and stir for about two minutes. Finally, whisk in the milk until the flour is fully dissolved.

  • Allow the milk to come up to a gentle simmer over medium heat, whisking often. Once simmering, the milk with thicken. Whisk in the chicken broth and allow it to come back to a simmer. Season the sauce with salt, pepper, and nutmeg.

  • Layer half of the potatoes in the bottom of a 4 quart casserole dish. Top the potatoes with half of the white sauce and half of the shredded cheddar. Repeat with one more layer of potatoes, sauce, and shredded cheddar.

  • Cover the casserole dish with foil and bake in the preheated 350ºF oven for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and continue to bake for another 30 minutes, or until the cheese is browned and bubbling on top. Let the casserole stand at room temperature for 10 minutes before serving.

See how we calculate recipe costs here.


Serving: 1servingCalories: 302.69kcalCarbohydrates: 39.15gProtein: 9.68gFat: 12.66gSodium: 462.3mgFiber: 2.68g

Nutritional values are estimates only. See our full nutrition disclosure here.


The equipment section above contains affiliate links to products we use and love. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

close up of potatoes au gratin being scooped out of the casserole dish

How to Make X – Step by Step Photos

peeled and sliced potatoes

Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Peel and slice three pounds of potatoes into ⅛-inch thick rounds. If you’re not confident in your knife skills, you can use a mandoline or food processor with a slicer attachment to create the thin, even slices.

Onion and butter in sauce pot

Finely dice one yellow onion. Sauté the onion with 4 Tbsp butter in a sauce pot until the onions are tender (about 5 minutes).

Flour added to pot with sautéed onions

Add 4 Tbsp flour to the pot with the sautéed onions and continue to cook and stir over medium heat for about two more minutes.

milk being poured into sauce pot

Whisk 2 cups milk into the pot with the onions and flour. Whisk well until all the flour is dissolved. Allow the milk to come up to a gentle simmer, at which point it will thicken.

chicken broth being poured into the sauce pot

Whisk in 1 cup chicken broth and allow it to come back up to a simmer.

Seasoning added to white sauce

Season the white sauce with ¼ tsp salt, ¼ tsp freshly cracked black pepper, and ⅛ tsp ground nutmeg.





Source link

morning glory breakfast cake – smitten kitchen


It’s hardly the biggest surprise of parenting, but I’ve yet to get my head around the idea that I’ve taken part in creating a morning person. My son has always woken up early; if it’s 5/5:30am, he’s on the sofa, reading a thick book, wondering why we do not care to watch the sunrise with him. Over the years, we’ve tried everything to change his wiring — lecturing, star charts, bribery, begging, asking the pediatrician to talk some sense into him [although “he wakes up early and reads chapter books!” didn’t quite have the doom-and-gloom impact we’d thought it would], prayer — and eventually, as you might have inferred from referring to it as wiring, we gave up.

what you'll need

When you wake up at the crack of dawn, you also require breakfast at an earlier hour than normal people, like your parents, who love to sleep. So there’s no, uh, confusion as to what is and is not a “breakfast food,” we’ve taken to packing him a breakfast and leaving it in the fridge: a hard-boiled egg, fruit, cheese, and some sort of muffin. After working my way through my own muffin archives, I realized that I was missing one of those hippie/morning glory-ish muffins that he loves, loaded with carrots and apple and dried fruit, sometimes coconut, and spices. I’ve made a few versions over the last few months, and was about to go another round when a new (out tomororw), wonderful cookbook arrived at my doorstep: Yossy Arefi’s Snacking Cakes.


grated carrotgrated applesapples, carrots, coconut, raisins, pineappleadd the dry ingredientsspread in pansprinkle with pepitas, if you wish

I probably don’t need to tell you that the idea of a snacking cake is firmly within the SK wheelhouse — I think cakes can be an everyday, just-because-it’s-Monday thing, and lucky for us, Arefi does too. I went right for the Morning Glory Cake and wondered why I’ve been fussing with muffin liners and trying to achieve the perfect dome when pouring it all in a pan is so much easier. I’ve tweaked Arefi’s recipe to make it even more breakfast-y — I lowered the sugar and oil, just a bit, swapped in whole wheat flour, raw sugar for white, added some dried fruit as well as coconut (both nods to the original*), ginger, because I like it here, and I use some toasted, salted pepitas on top. The cake remains plush and perfect for whatever hour you call breakfast.

* Did you know that the Morning Glory muffin has an official recipe? Pam McKinstry, created them in 1978 for her restaurant on Nantucket. The recipe was first published in Gourmet in 1981, and they were wildly popular for decades.

morning glory breakfast cake

Previously

6 months ago: How I Stock The Smitten Kitchen
1 year ago: Skillet Ravioli with Spinach
2 years ago: Candy Pork
3 years ago: Sausage and Potato Roast with Arugula and Bakery-Style Butter Cookies
4 years ago: Russian Honey Cake, Pumpkin Bread and Winter Squash Pancakes with Crispy Sage and Brown Butter
5 years ago: The Broccoli Roast and Salted Peanut Butter Cookies
6 years ago: Fall-Toush Salad and Carrot Cake with Cider and Olive Oil
7 years ago: Lazy Pizza Dough + Perfect Magherita Pizza and Apple Slab Pie
8 years ago: Pancetta, White Bean, and Swiss Chard Pot Pies and Apple Mosaic Tart with Salted Caramel
9 years ago: Cumin Seed Roasted Cauliflower with Yogurt
10 years ago: Roasted Eggplant Soup and Apple and Cheddar Scones
11 years ago: Jalapeno Cheddar Scones and Apple Cider Doughnuts
12 years ago: Beef, Leek, and Barley Soup and My Family’s Noodle Kugel
13 years ago: Arroz Con Pollo and Butternut Squash and Caramelized Onion Galette
14 years ago: Winter Squash Soup with Gruyere Croutons and Wild Mushroom Galette



Source link

Mini Pumpkin Pies | Sally’s Baking Addiction


With quicker bake and cool times, plus no need for blind baking the pie crust, there’s no denying that mini pumpkin pies are easier than the full-size version. They’re fun, festive, and baked in a mini muffin pan. This recipe uses my homemade pie crust and a deeply spiced filling like my original pumpkin pie.

mini pumpkin pies baked in a mini muffin pan

Pumpkin spice lattes, pumpkin donuts, pumpkin cookies, pumpkin spice potato chips (they exist!), pumpkin scented candles, and about a billion other pumpkin spice items this time of year. But where does it all begin? The Iconic Pumpkin Pie, of course.

The motherhood of everything pumpkin spice, pumpkin pie is the original source for our pumpkin fix. It’s a very popular recipe this time of year and one of the most frequent questions I receive is “how can I turn this into mini pumpkin pies?”

I’m always happy to answer this, but I figured it’d be most helpful to have a separate post dedicated to Mini Pumpkin Pies. Instead of telling you how I do it, let’s show you the process. These are FUN and let’s be honest… the cuteness is hard to resist.

You Will Love These Mini Pumpkin Pies Because:

  • they’re fun to make with kids
  • unlike the full-size version, there’s no blind baking the crust (YAY!)
  • they’re deeply spiced and sweetened with flavorful brown sugar
  • bake time & cool time are a lot quicker than regular pie
  • decoration can be minimal
  • they’re handheld & easy to serve

If larger pies intimidate you, try shrinking it. Or if you don’t want to mess with pie crust at all, you’ll appreciate my easy pumpkin pie bars instead.

mini pumpkin pies

Overview: How to Make Mini Pumpkin Pies

Have you made my mini pecan pies or mini quiches before? We’re doing the same thing here, only switching the filling. (One note, if you ever try my mini pecan pies, you need to pre-bake the crusts since the filling is so thin. Not necessary today though.)

  1. Make pie dough: My pie crust recipe yields 2 crusts and you’ll conveniently use both here. This crust is a my staple in my kitchen, a recipe I’ve had memorized for years. I use a mix of butter and shortening to make it. Why shortening? Shortening aids in creating flakiness. Why butter? Butter adds unparalleled flavor. If you’d like, try my all butter pie crust instead. The pie dough needs to chill for 2 hours before it’s useable, so I always recommend making it ahead.
  2. Make the filling: I’m certain you could make this filling in your sleep– it’s that easy. Mix all the ingredients together. That’s it, you’re done. Chill the filling in the refrigerator as you work on the dough or you could even make the filling 1-2 days in advance. See make ahead instructions in the recipe below.
  3. Roll out pie dough & cut into small circles: I recommend a 2.5 inch cookie cutter. If you don’t own a cookie cutter that size, I bet you have a measuring cup that’ll work. I use my 1/3 cup measuring cup. Re-roll the dough scraps until all the pie dough is used. You’ll have about 24 from each crust (48 total). Work quickly because the dough becomes delicate the longer it sits at room temperature.
  4. Fit the dough rounds into your mini muffin pan: Grease a mini muffin pan. Press the dough flat into the bottom of the crevice and up the sides.
  5. Fill each with the filling: The filling is pretty thick, but you can try pouring it into each crust. Spooning it in is a little neater.
  6. Bake until the crust is browned: These are so much quicker to bake and cool than a full size pumpkin pie. Cuter, quicker, more convenient! Have I sold you on these yet?
  7. Cool & serve: As always, fresh whipped cream finishes things off. I used a Wilton 1M tip to pipe a simple star-shape dollop on each.

pie dough for mini size quiches

pumpkin pie filling

unbaked pumpkin pies shaped in a mini muffin pan

Filling is Adapted From My Favorite Pumpkin Pie

These mini pumpkin pies are an adaptation of my favorite pumpkin pie recipe.

  • Reduced Amount: The most notable change is the reduced amount of filling. We don’t need as much filling as we would for a large 9-inch pie. These mini pumpkin pies are dough heavy– lots of crust in each bite. The filling really has to stand out, so we’ll use flavorful brown sugar and extra pumpkin pie spice.
  • No Cornstarch: Cornstarch thickens the filling for the full-size pie so we’re guaranteed neat slices. We’re not slicing these mini pumpkin pies– and the crust already keeps the filling tight and compact.
  • Black Pepper: Black pepper is our secret ingredient. I learned about the addition of black pepper to pumpkin pie filling over at King Arthur Flour a few years ago. I’m forever changed. Seriously! This little bit of spice turns your pumpkin pie into the BEST pumpkin pie. No one will know it’s there– all they’ll taste is a delightfully spiced flavor. I’m just going to shout it: IT’S SO GOOD.

My toddler loved to help make these. Shaping the dough was easy with a little help from mom and she could whisk the filling mostly by herself. She calls them baby pies. We still have more in the freezer and she gets especially excited when we thaw a few for our special treat. I think it’s because they’re just her size. 🙂

mini pumpkin pies with whipped cream on top

mini pumpkin pie with a bite taken out of it

More Variations of Pumpkin Pie

Print

clock clock icon

cutlery cutlery icon

flag flag icon

folder folder icon

instagram instagram icon

pinterest pinterest icon

print print icon

squares squares icon


Description

This delicious pumpkin pie filling recipe is adapted from my beloved pumpkin pie. Bake in my super flaky homemade pie crust in mini muffin pans.


Ingredients

  • 2 unbaked Flaky Pie Crust (what I used) or All Butter Pie Crust*
  • 1 and 1/4 cups (285g) pumpkin puree*
  • 3/4 cup (150g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) heavy cream
  • 1/4 cup (60ml) whole milk
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice*
  • small pinch black pepper (optional – see note)

  1. Pie crust: I like to make sure my pie dough is prepared before I begin the mini pies. Make pie dough the night before because it needs to chill in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours before using.
  2. Prep the filling: In a large bowl with a handheld or stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment– or simply using a whisk and mixing bowl– beat/whisk the pumpkin, brown sugar, heavy cream, milk, egg, salt, cinnamon, pumpkin pie spice, and black pepper together (on medium high speed if using a mixer) until completely combined, about 2 minutes. You’ll have about 3 cups of filling. Cover and refrigerate filling until step 6.
  3. Preheat oven to 375°F (191°C). Grease two 24-count mini muffin pans. Nonstick spray is best. (If you only have 1 mini muffin pan, bake these in batches. Roll out first pie dough, shape, fill, and bake then roll out the 2nd pie dough, shape, fill, and bake.)
  4. Shape the mini crusts: Working with 1 chilled pie dough at a time, place the dough onto a floured work surface. Roll into a large 12-inch circle. Use your warm hands to mold any cracking edges back together if needed. From the circle, cut rounds using a 2.5 inch cookie cutter. (Sometimes I use my 1/3 cup measuring cup, which is 2.5 inches in diameter.) You’ll have to re-roll the dough scraps a few times. Work quickly, as the dough becomes much more delicate the longer it’s at room temperature. You’ll get about 24 rounds per pie crust. Repeat with 2nd chilled pie dough for a total of about 48.
  5. Place the dough rounds into greased 24-count mini muffin pan(s). Press the dough flat into the bottom of the crevice and up the sides.
  6. Evenly spoon cold filling into each unbaked crust, filling to the top.
  7. Bake mini pies until the center is just about set and edges are lightly browned, about 21-25 minutes. Allow to cool for 5 minutes before removing from the pan. If greased well, the mini pies pop right out using a spoon to scoop them up. Cool, then serve at room temperature or refrigerate until chilled and serve cold. Filling deflates a bit as they cool. Top with whipped cream if desired. (Also pictured are sugared cranberries. See how to make them in my full size pumpkin pie recipe.)
  8. Cover leftover pies tightly and store in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead Freezing Instructions: The pie dough can be prepared ahead of time and stored in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or in the freezer for up to 3 months. The filling can also be made ahead of time, covered, and stored in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. To freeze, cool baked mini pumpkin pies completely, then layer between sheets of parchment paper in a large freezer-friendly container. Freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw at room temperature.
  2. Mini Muffin Pan (affiliate link): I love these Wilton Mini Muffin Pans and the Gold Touch line from Williams Sonoma.
  3. If using a 12-count standard muffin pan: Cut the pie dough into 3 or 3.5 inch circles. Other assembly instructions are the same. Bake for about 30 minutes or until the centers are set and edges are lightly browned. Yields about 16.
  4. Pie Crust: Both linked pie crust recipes make 2 crusts. You need 2 crusts for this recipe. You can use store-bought pie crust if desired. Make sure it is thawed.
  5. Pumpkin: Canned pumpkin is best in this recipe. If using fresh pumpkin puree, lightly blot it before adding to remove some moisture. The filling will be thinner and the bake time may be a little longer.
  6. Whole Milk & Heavy Cream: These are the best options to use to guarantee the filling sets up. Don’t skip the heavy cream. If needed, you can use a lower fat milk or nondairy milk in a pinch.
  7. Spices: Instead of prepared pumpkin pie spice, you can use 1/4 teaspoon each: ground nutmeg, ground cloves, ground allspice, and ground ginger. (You will still want to use 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon in the recipe, in addition to these spices.) A pinch of black pepper adds incredible spice flavor. I highly recommend it! Use a little less than 1/8 teaspoon.

Keywords: pumpkin pie, mini pies



Source link

Baked Honey Mustard Pork Chops


$6.11 recipe / $1.53 serving

Simple homemade sauces (or glazes) are your secret weapon in the kitchen. They’re the easiest way to turn a boring piece of meat into something really mouthwatering and amazing. Case in point: Honey Mustard Pork Chops. This particularly awesome sauce is a mix of honey, Dijon mustard, a little mayo for creaminess, and a few spices. Smear that awesome sauce on a some pan seared pork chops, pop them in the oven to heat through, and then finish them off with a few minutes under the broiler. The end result is creamy, caramelized, honey mustard madness. Madness in a good way, of course.

Originally posted 1-10-2015, updated 10-23-2020.

Overhead view of honey mustard pork chops in a round casserole dish

Baking Time May Vary

Pork chops are delicate flowers. If you over bake them, they get tough and dry, so you really have to pay them some attention. This is where cooking intuition comes in handy. I’ve provided a general estimated bake time in the recipe below, but the total time needed to get the internal temperature of the pork chops up to 145ºF will vary depending on several factors. The thickness of your pork chops will greatly determine how long they need to bake, as will the amount of time they spent in the skillet while searing. The longer they’re in the skillet, the less time they’ll need in the oven. So keep these things in mind as you cook your chops and I wish you all the most juicy and tender pork chop success!

Can I Use Boneless Pork Chops?

Yes, you can achieve something similar with boneless pork chops and a slightly altered technique. The recipe below is written for bone-in pork chops, which take longer to cook than boneless chops. If using boneless chops you can shorten the bake time considerably. Keep your meat thermometer handy so you can test their temperature and prevent overcooking. If you’re using thin boneless pork chops, you may not even need to bake them after searing. Simply slather the seared chops with the sauce right in the skillet and let the sauce reduce a little bit to more of a glaze consistency. Either way, make sure they reach an internal temperature of 145ºF. 

What to Serve with Honey Mustard Pork Chops

I served my Honey Mustard Pork Chops with some Roasted Brussels Sprouts and roasted sweet potatoes. Because they cooked at different temperatures from the pork chops, I cooked the vegetables first, then lowered the oven’s temperature before adding the pork chops. Make sure the oven is all the way down to the correct temperature before baking the pork chops, so you don’t accidentally over cook them! 🙂

Honey mustard pork chop on a plate with brussels sprouts and sweet potato

Honey Mustard Pork Chops

Honey Mustard Pork Chops are anything but boring with a sweet, tangy, and savory homemade honey mustard glaze.

Total Cost: $6.11 recipe / $1.53 serving

Author: Beth – Budget Bytes

Servings: 4

  • 1/3 cup mayonnaise ($0.53)
  • 2 Tbsp Dijon mustard ($0.18)
  • 2 Tbsp honey ($0.24)
  • 1/8 tsp garlic powder ($0.02)
  • 1/4 tsp smoked paprika ($0.03)
  • 1/4 tsp salt ($0.02)
  • 1/4 tsp Freshly cracked pepper ($0.02)
  • 1 Tbsp cooking oil ($0.02)
  • 4 bone-in pork chops, one-inch thick (about 2.5 lbs.) ($5.02)
  • Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Prepare the honey mustard sauce by stirring together the mayonnaise, Dijon, honey, garlic powder, paprika, salt, and freshly cracked black pepper.

  • Use a paper towel to dry off the surface of the pork chops, then season each side with a pinch of salt and freshly cracked pepper. Heat one tablespoon of cooking oil in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. When the skillet is very hot add two pork chops at a time and cook until golden brown on each side (3 minutes each side). Place the browned pork chops in a casserole dish (it’s okay if they overlap slihtly).

  • Smear the honey mustard sauce over both sides of the pork chops in the casserole dish. Bake for about 30 minutes for 1-inch thick chops, about 20 minutes for ¾-inch thick chops, or until the internal temperature reaches 165ºF. To achieve more browning, switch the oven to broil and broil the chops for 3-5 minutes or until the surface is golden brown and bubbly. Serve hot.

See how we calculate recipe costs here.


Serving: 1ServingCalories: 475.63kcalCarbohydrates: 8.9gProtein: 49.85gFat: 25.65gSodium: 613.25mgFiber: 0.08g

Nutritional values are estimates only. See our full nutrition disclosure here.


The equipment section above contains affiliate links to products we use and love. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

baked honey mustard pork chops in a casserole dish from the side

How to Make Baked Honey Mustard Pork Chops – Step by Step Photos

honey mustard ingredients in a bowl

Start by mixing up the honey mustard sauce. Stir together 1/3 cup mayonnaise, 2 Tbsp Dijon mustard, 2 Tbsp honey, 1/8 tsp garlic powder, 1/4 tsp smoked paprika, 1/4 tsp salt, and some freshly cracked pepper (about 15 cranks of a pepper mill).

Mixed honey mustard sauce

Then you have a really delicious honey mustard sauce that you will have to restrain yourself from licking off the spoon. Set it aside and try to forget about it for a minute.

Bone-in Pork chops on a cutting board

You’ll want four thick-cut bone-in pork chops for this recipe. Try to get pork chops that are 3/4 to 1-inch thick. The pork chops I used today are about ¾-inch thick. Preheat the oven to 350ºF. Use a paper towel to dry off the surface of the chops (this helps them sear better), then season each side with a pinch of salt and some freshly cracked pepper.

Seared pork chops in a skillet

Heat one Tbsp cooking oil in a heavy skillet over medium-high heat. Make sure the skillet and oil are very hot, then add two chops at a time and cook until golden brown on each side (about 3 minutes per side). If it’s taking longer than about 3 minutes to get a nice brown color, make sure you reduce the baking time to compensate because the pork chops will already be more cooked when they go into the oven.

Pork chops coated with honey mustard glaze

After browning the chops, place them into a casserole dish (it’s okay if they overlap just a little). Smear the honey mustard sauce over both sides of the pork chops. Bake in the preheated oven for 20-30 minutes, or until they reach an internal temperature of 145ºF (about 20 min for ¾-inch thick, or closer to 30 for 1-inch thick chops).

baked honey mustard pork chops in a casserole dish

Finish them off with just a few minutes under the broiler for maximum browning action (I did not move the oven rack, I simply switched the setting from bake to broil and kept an eye on them). 

Finished honey mustard pork chops garnished with parsley

So yummy! I garnished with a little parsley for color, but it’s not needed to flavor the honey mustard pork chops. 





Source link

Easy Roasted Brussels Sprouts – Budget Bytes


$2.21 recipe / $0.55 serving

I’m all about keeping my side dishes as easy as possible. I want my main dish to be the star of the show, and I don’t want to spend tons of time or energy on something that is just being served on the side, so roasted vegetables are almost always on the menu! They’re easy, tasty, and mostly hands off. Since we’re moving into “winter vegetable” season, I thought I’d do a quick tutorial on roasted Brussels sprouts, so you can whip up this simple and delicious side dish with any of your fall or winter meals.

Overhead shot of a bowl of roasted Brussels sprouts

What do Brussels Sprouts Taste Like?

I’m sure there are many of you out there who have never had a Brussels sprout before in your life, so I want to describe them to you a bit first. To me they taste like mini cabbages, but perhaps not quite so bland. What makes them fun, to me, is the texture. The delicate, tightly bound leaves just are so enjoyable to eat! But they are more on the bitter end of the vegetable spectrum, so if you are very sensitive to bitter flavors, which some people just are genetically, Brussels sprouts may not be for you.

When are Brussels Sprouts in Season?

Brussels sprouts can be on the pricier side for vegetables, so it’s important to take advantage of them while they’re in season. The season can vary a bit, depending on where they’re grown, but they are a cold weather vegetable so you’ll most likely start to see them pop up on grocery stores in the U.S. from October to February. 

Can I Use Frozen Brussels Sprouts?

Frozen Brussels sprouts can be found for a fairly good price year-round, so you may be tempted to try to roast those instead of fresh Brussels sprouts. While you certainly can roast a frozen Brussels sprout, I find that fresh create a much better texture and flavor. Frozen Brussels sprouts will be softer and a little more wet (even after roasting), and I find that roasted fresh Brussels sprouts have a more vibrant flavor. 

How to Season Roasted Brussels Sprouts

One thing that I love about roasted vegetables, roasted Brussels sprouts included, is how many different ways you can season them. They’re delicious with just a bit of salt and pepper, or you can really go to town. The recipe below uses a simple mix of salt, pepper, and garlic, but you could also do something like steak seasoning, curry powder, Cajun seasoning, seasoning salt (like Lawry’s), a Garlic Herb Seasoning, Everything But the Bagel Seasoning, or Parmesan cheese (Parmesan would go great alone or along with any of the previously listed seasoning blends). 

P.S. These roasted Brussels sprouts would be SO GOOD dipped in Comeback Sauce!

Close up side view of Roasted Brussels Sprouts in a bowl

 

Roasted Brussels Sprouts

Roasted Brussels sprouts and an easy, tasty, and versatile side dish to compliment any of your fall or winter meals.

Total Cost: $2.21 recipe / $0.55 serving

Author: Beth – Budget Bytes

Servings: 4

  • 1 lb. Brussels sprouts ($1.99)
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil ($0.16)
  • 1/4 tsp salt ($0.02)
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder ($0.02)
  • 1/4 tsp freshly cracked black pepper ($0.02)
  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Wash the Brussels sprouts and trim off any dry ends. Cut each Brussels sprout in half.

  • Place the cut Brussels sprouts on a parchment lined baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle with salt, garlic powder, and pepper. Toss until the Brussels sprouts are well coated oil and seasoning. Turn each Brussels sprout so that it is cut side facing down.

  • Roast the Brussels sprouts in the oven for about 25 minutes, or until they are browned and caramelized on the edges. You can stir the Brussels sprouts at about 20 minutes to gauge the amount of browning on the bottom layer of the sprouts. No need to make sure they’re all face down again for the final few minutes.

  • Taste one Brussels sprout and adjust the salt or pepper to your liking, then serve hot.

See how we calculate recipe costs here.


Serving: 1servingCalories: 157.55kcalCarbohydrates: 20.45gProtein: 7.65gFat: 7.45gSodium: 471.65mgFiber: 8.6g

Nutritional values are estimates only. See our full nutrition disclosure here.


The equipment section above contains affiliate links to products we use and love. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Close up of a roasted Brussels sprout on a fork with the bowl in the background

How to Roast Brussels Sprouts – Step by Step Photos

Brussels sprouts being cut in half

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Wash 1 lb. Brussels sprouts, then cut off any dry stems. Cut each Brussels sprout in half. The sprouts I had today were very fresh and the ends were not dried out at all, so I simply cut them in half.

Season Brussels Sprouts

Place the Brussels sprouts on a parchment lined baking sheet. Drizzle with 1 Tbsp olive oil, then add ¼ tsp salt, ¼ tsp garlic powder, and ¼ tsp freshly cracked black pepper.

Brussels sprouts ready to roast

Turn all of the Brussels sprouts halves over so the cut side is facing down. Transfer the baking sheet to the preheated oven.

Roasted Brussels Sprouts on a baking sheet

Roast for about 25 minutes, or until they have achieved the level of browning that you like. The total time may change depending on the size of your Brussels sprouts. You can give them a stir after about 20 minutes to see how much they have browned on the cut side. No need to flip them all back over for the final few minutes.

Roasted Brussels sprouts on a plate with pork chops and sweet potatoes

Give the roasted Brussels sprouts a taste and adjust the salt or pepper to your liking. Serve hot!





Source link

Caramel Apple Upside Down Cake


This caramel apple upside down cake is a fall must-make. Combining a soft cinnamon-spiced cake with buttery caramelized apples, we’re essentially getting two desserts in one. After inverting, the topping’s juices seep down into the cake and add unbeatable flavor and moisture. What you’ll love most, besides the flavors, is that there’s no fancy decoration required– the lovely garnish is literally baked into the cake!

apple upside down cake

I’m so excited to bring you an improved version of one of my very favorite recipes. When I started this food blog back in 2011, I had about 8 years experience in the kitchen. Most of that was through my high school and college years. Now, with another 10 years on top of that, 1,200+ published recipes, and 3 cookbooks under my belt, I have *a little* more experience. I’ve basically lived in a kitchen since 2011. LOL.

One of the first recipes I published was caramel apple upside down cake. It’s a forever favorite and totally deserving of that early spot in my archives. I bake this recipe at least once every fall season and have made a couple minor updates to the recipe over the years. The cake is better than ever. I figured you’d appreciate seeing what I’ve done.

What’s more, the recipe is written in a clearer format with extra notes and success tips. Sometimes a little refresh is all we need!


This Caramel Apple Upside Down Cake Is:

  • melt-in-your-mouth soft & moist
  • extra flavorful
  • easy– no crazy ingredients or techniques required
  • perfectly sized for a small family or gathering
  • the best destination for your freshly picked apples 😉

Try it at least once. I guarantee it will be a repeat recipe in your kitchen.

apple upside down cake on white cake stand

apple upside down cake with 1 slice removed

Apple Upside Down Cake Topping

The topping is baked underneath the cake. After the cake slightly cools, we’ll invert it onto a serving plate. The caramel flavor comes from the butter and brown sugar. Combined with vanilla and apples, the topping alone makes this a recipe worth repeating. It’s downright GOOD.

I know you’ll appreciate this: I mention this above, but it’s worth repeating. Apple upside down cake is basically already frosted– once you invert the cake, the garnish is already there!

A few preliminary notes on the topping:

  • The topping in my original recipe had a little too much butter. I also reduced the cinnamon and put more in the cake itself.
  • Melt the butter and brown sugar together on the stove, then cook for 1 minute. The mixture will slightly thicken and take on a caramel-like flavor that intensifies as the cake bakes. Not a lot of recipes do this, but it makes a big flavor difference. In my pineapple upside down cake recipe, we simply add melted butter to the cake pan and sprinkle the brown sugar on top. As a result, you don’t really get the same caramel flavor. Perfectly fine for that recipe, but why not take an extra minute here?
  • Arrange the apple slices on top of the butter/brown sugar mixture. Try to squeeze as many apple slices in the pan as you can. You won’t regret extra caramel-y apples!

apple slices arranged in glass a pie dish

Let’s Make the Cake Batter

The cake batter is pretty straightforward and similar to the original recipe. Like most cakes, the base is creamed butter and sugar. Regular sugar lightens up the crumb, while brown sugar adds flavor. Use both in this cake. This cake is super soft and cinnamon-spiced. It’s tasty on its own, but even better with the apple topping.

Two Baking Tips:

  1. Pour and spread the cake batter evenly on top of the apples. You can bake this cake in a cake pan or pie dish, but make sure it’s at least 2 inches deep. I recommend this pie dish, which is 1.8 inches deep but I never have an overflow issue.
  2. Because of the wet bottom layer (which is the topping), the cake takes much longer than a typical 1 layer cake. Its juices will bubble up the sides, creating these incredible caramelized edges. (See the edges below? They’re so good!) With upside down cakes, it’s always good practice to place a baking pan or sheet on a lower rack to catch any juices should they splatter over the edges.

apple cake batter before and after baking

caramel apple upside down cake

slice of apple upside down cake

Expect a Dense Cake

I’ve made hundreds of upside down cakes, or so it seems, and I say with 100% certainty that this style of cake will always be on the denser side. (Unless you are using store-bought cake mix.) The cake is served upside down. The weight of the topping, which is the bottom of the cake as it bakes, weighs down the crumb beneath it. Upside down cake will never be as light and airy as white cake. If you were to make this exact cake batter and serve it right-side-up, the cake would taste much airier. Does that make sense?

While this apple upside down cake is mega soft and not nearly as dense as, say, pound cake, it’s not overly light either. I know you’ll love its unique texture, especially paired with the caramel apple topping. Let me know how you like it!

Print

clock clock icon

cutlery cutlery icon

flag flag icon

folder folder icon

instagram instagram icon

pinterest pinterest icon

print print icon

squares squares icon


Description

This stunning apple upside down cake combines a soft cinnamon-spiced cake with a delicious buttery caramel topping. Pack those apples into the pan– this cake can hold a lot and you won’t regret those extra slices!


Ingredients

Topping

  • 6 Tablespoons (85gunsalted butter
  • 1/2 cup (100g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 2 medium apples, peeled and sliced into 1/4 inch slices (1.52 cups slices)*

Cake

  • 1 and 1/2 cups (190g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick; 115g) unsalted butter, softened to room temperature
  • 1/2 cup (100g) granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (100g) packed light or dark brown sugar
  • 2 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 6 Tablespoons (90ml) whole milk, at room temperature*

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F (177°C).
  2. Prepare topping first: Combine butter and brown sugar together in a small saucepan over medium heat. Whisk occasionally until butter has melted. Cook, whisking constantly, for 1 minute as mixture thickens. Remove from heat and whisk in the cinnamon and vanilla extract. Pour into an ungreased 9×2 inch pie dish or round cake pan. (Make sure the pan is 2 inches deep. I recommend this pie dish, which is 1.8 inches deep but I never have an overflow issue.) Arrange the apple slices neatly on top, overlapping where necessary. See photo above. Place pan in the refrigerator for a few minutes as you prepare the cake batter. This helps solidify or “set” the topping’s arrangement.
  3. Make the cake batter: Whisk the flour, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt together. Set aside.
  4. Using a handheld or stand mixer fitted with a paddle or whisk attachment, beat the butter on high speed until smooth and creamy, about 1 minute. Add both sugars and beat on high speed until creamed together, about 1 minute. Scrape down the sides and up the bottom of the bowl with a rubber spatula as needed. On high speed, beat in the eggs and vanilla extract until combined. Scrape down the sides and up the bottom of the bowl as needed. Pour the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients. Turn the mixer onto low speed and as the mixer runs, slowly pour in the milk. Beat on low speed just until all of the ingredients are combined. Do not over-mix. You may need to whisk it all by hand to make sure there are no lumps at the bottom of the bowl. The batter will be slightly thick.
  5. Remove topping from the refrigerator. Pour and spread cake batter evenly over topping.
  6. Bake for 40-46 minutes, tenting foil on top of the cake halfway through bake time to prevent the top from over-browning before the center has a chance to fully cook. The cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out mostly clean– a couple moist crumbs are OK. Don’t be alarmed if your cake takes longer or if the cake rises up and sticks to the foil. (We serve the cake upside down anyway!)
  7. Remove cake from the oven and cool on a wire rack for just 15 minutes. Invert the slightly cooled cake onto a cake stand or serving plate. Some of the juices from the topping will seep over the sides– that’s ok. You can slice and serve the cake warm, but the slices will be messy. I find it’s best to cool the cake completely at room temperature before slicing and serving. Do not refrigerate the cake to speed up the cooling process because it could end up tasting overly dense.
  8. Cover leftover slices and store for up to 3 days in the refrigerator or 3 months in the freezer. Thaw at room temperature. I don’t recommend freezing the cake as a whole because the topping arrangement doesn’t thaw very nicely. See make ahead instructions below.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead Instructions: You can refrigerate the topping in step 2 for up to 1 day. If refrigerating for longer than 1 hour, cover it tightly. Other than that, this isn’t the best cake to make ahead of time or freeze because the apples will settle down into the cake– while still tasty, the presentation won’t be as pleasing. You can, however, prepare the cake batter’s wet ingredients (cover and refrigerate) and dry ingredients (cover at room temperature) separately up to 1 day ahead of time, then continue with the recipe the next day. Let the wet ingredients come to room temperature before mixing.
  2. Old Recipe: The current cake recipe was updated in 2020. If you loved the old cake recipe, originally published in 2012, here it is: increase the topping’s butter to 1/2 cup (1 stick; 115g) and add 1/4 teaspoon each of ground cloves and ground nutmeg when you stir in the cinnamon. Sprinkle 1/4 cup of walnuts on top of the apples before pouring/spreading on the cake batter. In the cake batter, reduce the milk to 1/4 cup (60ml).
  3. Apples: Use your favorite variety of apple. I typically use Granny Smith, Fuji, or Honeycrisp.
  4. Milk: Whole milk is best, but you can use lower fat or nondairy milk if needed.
  5. Why is everything at room temperature? All refrigerated items should be at room temperature so the batter mixes together easily and evenly. Read here for more information.

Keywords: apples, caramel, upside down cake



Source link

Tiramisu Crepe Cake Recipe | Sally’s Baking Addiction


This impressive tiramisu crepe cake features 25 paper-thin homemade crepes, 24 layers of fluffy tiramisu filling, dustings of cocoa powder, and is finished with sweet whipped cream on top. It’s almost unbelievable that such a fancy cake is totally doable in your home kitchen. There’s no baking involved and everything can be prepped in advance!

The cake is 8 inches wide and about 7 inches tall with the whipped cream on top.

tiramisu crepe cake

At first glance, does this look like a stack of tortillas with sour cream? Because as I was editing these photos, I kept seeing things. Or maybe I was just craving tacos. HA!

In all seriousness, this is CREPE CAKE. Here we have over 2 dozen delicately thin crepes stacked high with tiramisu-inspired mascarpone filling. The mascarpone features rich espresso flavor and is spiked with a hint of rum. We’re reaching new levels with this mile high crepe cake, also known as mille crepe or Gâteau de Crêpes in French. This show-stopping dessert is becoming increasingly popular in American bakeries and since we aren’t able to do much travel these days, why not try this lovely dessert in your home kitchen?

I promise you can handle it.


This Tiramisu Crepe Cake Is:

  • Secretly simple (I promise! My instructions are super detailed.)
  • Creamy & light
  • Boozy, but you can skip the alcohol if desired
  • Best made ahead of time
  • Perfect if you’re searching for a unique cake

crepe mille cake

Overview: How to Make Tiramisu Crepe Cake

  1. Make the crepes. Crepe batter must chill for 30-60 minutes before cooking, then it usually takes about an hour to cook them all.
  2. Make the tiramisu filling. You can do this ahead of time. More on the filling below.
  3. Assemble the crepe cake. If you know how to spread creamy filling onto a crepe (like spreading butter on bread!), you can assemble a crepe cake. Using a fine mesh strainer, dust each layer of filling with cocoa powder. If you don’t have one, skip the cocoa powder or use your fingers to sprinkle it on top.
  4. If desired, pipe whipped cream on top.
  5. Chill cake for at least 3 hours before slicing and serving. This time in the refrigerator helps the flavors develop and more importantly, allows the cake to set. If skipped, you won’t be able to slice it.

Homemade Crepes

Do you know how to make homemade crepes? I have a detailed How to Make Crepes tutorial that sets you up for success. After you read about the proper techniques and watch the video tutorial, you’ll find that crepes are relatively simple. (And anyone who tried them for Sally’s Baking Challenge earlier this year can agree. Much easier than expected!)

  • We’re using the same crepes recipe, only doubled. I switched around the milk:water ratio and since this is dessert, I added a little more sugar. A little extra sugar helped crisp up the edges. These crepes taste incredible by themselves or in a cake.

The recipe below yields about 28 crepes. Use 25 in this cake. It’s always convenient to have a few extra on hand if any crepes tear. Or let’s be serious, if you want to taste test.

Crepes Success Tips

  1. Chill the batter: I include this in the written recipe below, but it’s definitely worth explaining. One secret to the best crepes is to chill the crepe batter for at least 30-60 minutes and up to 1 day. This time in the refrigerator enhances the batter’s flavor and gives the flour a chance to fully hydrate.
  2. Butter the pan between each crepe: The best part of crepes is their thin and delicately crisp edges. To achieve this, butter the pan between EACH crepe. Sounds like a pain, but just grab a stick of butter and coat the pan before adding more batter. You won’t regret it.
  3. Twirl the pan: Pour the batter into the center of the hot and buttered pan. Lift the pan up and twirl it so the batter stretches as far out as it can go. (The thinner the crepe, the better texture it has– trust me.) This crucial technique is much easier than it sounds and you can watch me do it my crepes video tutorial.

homemade crepes

Tiramisu Filling

Tiramisu is a timeless Italian dessert and easily one of the most popular desserts in the world. I love using its flavors in other ways. Like traditional tiramisu, this filling is made in a couple different parts. Whip heavy cream into medium peaks (I like to add rum!), set aside, then beat mascarpone, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla extract, and espresso together until creamy. For the espresso, simply combine warm water and espresso powder together– we’ll make it very strong so we aren’t using too much liquid. Fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture. Have no fear if the filling looks a little curdled– it doesn’t taste that way in the cake.

  • You will love this tiramisu inspired filling. It yields about 4 cups, which is plenty to use as a filling inside a 2 or 3 layer cake. (Maybe in vanilla cake?)

Here are a few step-by-step photos of the filling. The whipped cream + rum, then the mascarpone mixture:

tiramisu filling in glass bowls

Combine both to yield a fluffy mousse-like filling:

mascarpone tiramisu cake filling

Let’s Assemble The Cake

If assembling or decorating a traditional layer cake intimidates you, you’re in luck. For a crepe cake, all you have to do is spread and stack. Start with a dollop of filling on your cake stand or serving plate, which helps keep the tall cake in place. Place your bottom crepe securely on top, then spread a heaping 2 Tablespoons of filling on it. Dust with cocoa powder. Repeat until everything is used up. This goes pretty quickly if you have a baking buddy helping out!

Baker’s Tip: The tiramisu filling uses 1 and 1/2 cups of heavy cream. If you pick up a pint of heavy cream, you’ll have 1/2 cup leftover and you can use that for your whipped cream topping! I piped the whipped cream, but you can simply spread it on top if you’d like. If you have extra, feel free to spread it all around the edges of the cake too. I skip that, so mine is more of a naked-style crepe cake.

assembling tiramisu crepe cake

crepe cake with tiramisu filling

What’s the Texture Like?

Are you familiar with icebox cake? Icebox cake is essentially cookies or graham crackers layered with a creamy filling– exactly like tiramisu. After refrigerating or freezing, the graham crackers/cookies take on a super soft texture. The whole dessert tastes like mousse or a slightly textured creamy trifle. It’s delicious. We have the same texture here! After chilling for a couple hours, you can slide a fork right through each slice.

tiramisu crepe cake

tiramisu crepe cake

Helpful Tools:

  • A blender works WONDERFULLY to smooth out the crepe batter because it cuts that flour perfectly into all the wet ingredients. If you don’t have a blender, just use a mixing bowl and whisk. I use my Ninja Blender. (affiliate link*)
  • Though professional chefs may use a specialty crepe pan, I find a Small 8-inch Skillet (affiliate link*) works perfectly at home. If you don’t have a small skillet, use a larger one but make sure you keep the crepes THIN.
  • Offset Spatula for spreading the filling.
  • Fine Mesh Strainer for dusting cocoa powder.
  • Large Round Piping Tip (and a disposable or reusable piping bag) for whipped cream topping.

Print

clock clock icon

cutlery cutlery icon

flag flag icon

folder folder icon

instagram instagram icon

pinterest pinterest icon

print print icon

squares squares icon


Description

This recipe yields a 50 layer 8-inch wide crepe cake. Make sure you chill the crepe batter in the refrigerator before cooking the crepes and chill the assembled cake before serving. With the piped whipped cream on top, this cake is about 7 inches tall.


Ingredients

  • 6 Tablespoons (85g) unsalted butter, plus 5 more Tablespoons (70g) for the pan
  • 2 cups (250g) all-purpose flour (spoon & leveled)
  • 1/4 cup (50g) granulated sugar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups (480ml) whole milk, at room temperature*
  • 1/2 cup (120ml) room temperature water
  • 4 large eggs, at room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Tiramisu Filling

  • 2 teaspoons espresso powder*
  • 2 teaspoons warm water
  • 1 and 1/2 cups (360ml) heavy cream
  • 1 Tablespoon (15ml) rum or Grand Marnier* (optional)
  • 8 ounces (1 cup) mascarpone, cold or at room temperature
  • 1 cup (120g) confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup (22g) unsweetened natural or dutch-process cocoa powder (optional)

Whipped Cream Topping

  • 1/2 cup (120ml) heavy cream
  • 1 Tablespoon (15ml) rum or Grand Marnier* (optional)
  • 2 Tablespoons (15g) confectioners’ sugar
  • 1 teaspoon unsweetened natural or dutch-process cocoa powder (optional)

  1. If you’ve never made crepes before, I strongly recommend reviewing my How to Make Crepes tutorial post, which includes plenty of helpful success tips and a video tutorial.
  2. Make the crepes batter: Melt 6 Tablespoons of butter in the microwave or on the stove. Cool for about 5 minutes before using in the next step. The remaining butter is for the skillet.
  3. Add the cooled melted butter, flour, sugar, salt, milk, water, eggs, and vanilla in a blender or large food processor.  If you don’t have a blender or food processor, use a large mixing bowl and whisk by hand. Blend on medium-high speed for 20-30 seconds until everything is combined. The mixture will be silky smooth and the consistency of cream, much thinner than pancake batter. Cover the blender tightly or pour into a medium bowl, cover tightly, and chill in the refrigerator for 1 hour and up to 1 day. This time in the refrigerator is imperative because it gives the flour a chance to become fully hydrated.
  4. Cook the crepes: Use the remaining butter for greasing the pan between each crepe. Place an 8-inch skillet over medium heat and generously grease it with some of the reserved butter. If you don’t have a skillet this size, use a larger one but make sure you keep the crepes thin. Once the skillet is hot, pour 3-4 Tablespoons (closer to 3 is best) of batter into the center of the pan. Tilt/twirl the pan so the batter stretches as far as it will go. The thinner the crepe, the better the texture. Cook for 1-2 minutes, then flip as soon as the bottom is set. Don’t wait too long to flip crepes or else they will taste rubbery. Cook the other side for 30 seconds until set. Transfer the cooked crepe to a large plate and repeat with the remaining batter, making sure to butter the pan between each crepe. If desired, separate each crepe with parchment paper so they do not stick together. Though, if using enough butter in your pan, the crepes won’t stick. Yields about 28 crepes.
  5. Loosely cover and set your crepes aside at room temperature as you prepare the tiramisu filling. You can also tightly cover and refrigerate the crepes for up to 1 day. Crepes must be room temperature or cold before you begin assembling the cake.
  6. Make the tiramisu filling: First part of the tiramisu filling is to prepare concentrated espresso flavoring. Using a fork, mix the espresso powder and warm water together in a very small bowl. Set aside to cool down for a few minutes. You will mix it with the mascarpone. Using a hand mixer or a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, whip the heavy cream and rum (if using) together on medium-high speed until medium peaks form, about 3-4 minutes. Medium peaks are between soft/loose peaks and stiff peaks. Set whipped cream aside. With a handheld or stand mixer fitted with a paddle or whisk attachment, beat the mascarpone, confectioners’ sugar, vanilla extract, and cooled espresso liquid together on medium speed in a large bowl until combined and smooth, about 2 minutes. Fold the whipped cream into the mascarpone mixture. Don’t worry if it looks curdled– mine sometimes does– it doesn’t taste that way and will smooth out when it’s stacked in the cake. Use filling immediately or cover and chill in the refrigerator for up to 1 day. Yields about 4 cups filling.
  7. Assemble the cake: Spread 1-2 teaspoons of filling on the center of your cake stand or cake serving plate. This helps adhere the cake to the plate. Place a crepe on top. Spread about 2 heaping Tablespoons of filling evenly on top. If desired, dust with cocoa powder. Repeat layering crepes, filling, and a dusting of cocoa powder. Top with final and last crepe.
  8. Whipped Cream Topping: You can frost the cake with whipped cream before or after chilling the cake in the refrigerator in step 9. My advice– I find it tastes better and slices easier if you chill the cake WITH the whipped cream on top. Using a hand mixer or a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, whip the heavy cream, rum (if using), and confectioners’ sugar together on medium-high speed until medium peaks form, about 3-4 minutes. Medium peaks are between soft/loose peaks and stiff peaks and are the perfect consistency for spreading or piping. Spread or pipe whipped cream on top of the cake. If you have extra, feel free to spread all around the sides of the cake too. If desired, dust with cocoa powder.
  9. Refrigerate the cake for at least 3 hours and up to 1 day before serving. Chilling the cake in the refrigerator is imperative because the cake won’t slice otherwise. No need to cover the cake if you’re chilling it for only 3 hours. If chilling longer than that, I recommend loosely covering the cake.
  10. Cover leftover cake and store in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Notes

  1. Make Ahead & Freezing Instructions: Crepe batter, cooked crepes, filling, and assembled cake can all be prepared in advance. See the end of step 3, step 5, the end of step 6, and step 9. To freeze, prepare cake through step 8, but do not dust with cocoa powder on top. Tightly cover and freeze for up to 3 months. Remove from the freezer, evenly dust the top with cocoa, then thaw in the refrigerator for at least 24 hours. (Can thaw covered or uncovered.)
  2. Milk: I prefer whole milk in the crepe batter. For a richer tasting crepe, half-and-half or heavy cream work too. 2% is OK, but I wouldn’t use lower fat milks. Any low fat or full fat nondairy milk works too.
  3. Espresso Powder: You need very strong espresso for the filling. Here we are making it using espresso powder and water. If you can’t find espresso powder, use instant coffee powder instead. You can also use 1 Tablespoon of super super super strong room temperature or cold black coffee instead of the espresso powder/water.
  4. Alcohol: The filling and whipped cream topping include alcohol. I recommend rum or Grand Marnier. Skip the alcohol for a non-alcoholic version. No need to replace it with anything.
  5. Cocoa Powder: Dusting cocoa powder between each layer, as well as on top of the crepe cake, is optional. If using, you can use natural or dutch-process cocoa.

Keywords: tiramisu, crepes, cake



Source link

Sheet Pan Kielbasa Potatoes and Green Beans


$9.47 recipe / $2.37 serving

THIS is the sheet pan meal to end all sheet pan meals! It’s similar to some I’ve made before, but it is by far the easiest one yet, and without sacrificing any flavor. This Sheet Pan Kielbasa, Potatoes, and Green Beans recipe is filling, tasty, and as easy as it gets, with only SIX simple ingredients, and very little hands on time. I don’t know what more you could want from a dinner recipe! 🙌

Sheet pan kielbasa, potatoes, and green beans with a spatula

Can I Use a Different Sausage?

Yes, if you can not find kielbasa, any sort of smoked sausage will taste delicious with this combination of ingredients. It’s so flexible!

Can I Use Fresh Green Beans?

I used frozen green beans for this recipe because they are already cleaned, cut, and blanched before freezing. The blanching keeps the green beans a little more moist as they roast in the oven. You can use fresh green beans if you prefer, just keep in mind that they will dry out a little more while roasting than frozen green beans.

What is Steak Seasoning?

Steak seasoning is my short cut for this recipe. It’s a bottled spice blend, sometimes called Montreal Steak Seasoning, that you should be able to find at any major grocery store in the U.S. It’s a chunky mix of salt, pepper, garlic, red pepper, and sometimes a couple other spices. I love steak seasoning because that chunky grind of the spices gives the dish not only texture but these wonderful pops of flavor in every bite. Don’t skip it! 🙂

Can I Use Different Potatoes?

Yes! Again, this recipe is so flexible. I used small red potatoes, but you can substitute larger red potatoes or even russet potatoes if that is what you have. Just make sure to cut the potatoes into one-inch pieces so they roast at an even pace with everything else.

Sheet pan kielbasa, potatoes, and green beans in a bowl with a fork

 

Sheet Pan Kielbasa Potatoes and Green Beans

Sheet pan meals don’t get an easier or more delicious than this Sheet Pan Kielbasa Potatoes and Green Beans dinner.

Total Cost: $9.47 recipe / $2.37 serving

Author: Beth – Budget Bytes

Servings: 4

  • 24 oz. petite red potatoes ($2.99)
  • 12 oz. kielbasa ($4.69)
  • 1 yellow onion ($0.32)
  • 12 oz. frozen green beans ($1.00)
  • 2 Tbsp olive oil ($0.32)
  • 1/2 Tbsp steak seasoning ($0.15)
  • Preheat the oven to 400ºF. Wash and slice the potatoes into 1-inch pieces. Slice the kielbasa into medallions. Dice the onion into 1-inch pieces.

  • Add the potatoes, kielbasa, onion, and frozen green beans (no need to thaw) to a large baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and sprinkle the steak seasoning over top. Use your hands to toss the ingredients until everything is coated in oil and spices.

  • Transfer the baking sheet to the oven and roast in the oven for 20 minutes, then give the ingredients on the sheet pan a good stir. Roast for an additional 15 minutes, or until the ingredients achieve the level of browning you desire. Serve hot.

See how we calculate recipe costs here.


Serving: 1servingCalories: 504.88kcalCarbohydrates: 40.3gProtein: 15.65gFat: 32.45gSodium: 1028.88mgFiber: 5.88g

Nutritional values are estimates only. See our full nutrition disclosure here.


The equipment section above contains affiliate links to products we use and love. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Love Sheet Pan Meals? Try these other flavors:

How to Make Sheet Pan Kielbasa Potatoes and Green Beans – Step by Step Photos

Meal ingredients whole on the sheet pan

Preheat the oven to 400ºF. This is all that goes into the dinner, plus some olive oil and steak seasoning. How simple is that?? 24oz. petite red potatoes, 12oz. kielbasa, 12oz. frozen green beans, and one yellow onion.

Chopped ingredients on the sheet pan

Chop the potatoes into 1-inch pieces. Slice the kielbasa into medallions. Dice the onion into 1-inch pieces. Add the potatoes, kielbasa, onion, and green beans (no need to thaw) to the sheet pan.

Steak seasoning bottle close up

This is all I used to season the sheet pan meal. The chunky texture of this seasoning blend really adds a lot of texture and flavor differentiation to every bite! 

Seasoned sheet pan meal

Add 2 Tbsp olive oil and ½ Tbsp of the steak seasoning to the ingredients on the sheet pan, then toss really well until everything is coated in oil and seasoning.

Roasted sheet pan meal

Then place the sheet pan in the oven, roast for 20 minutes, then give it a good stir. Return it to the oven and roast for about another 15 minutes, or until it’s browned to the level that you like. 

Close up of sheet pan kielbasa potatoes and green beans on a sheet pan

It’s hard to describe how awesome this is. It doesn’t even need any sort of dressing or sauce. The fat and seasoning from the kielbasa soak into the potatoes and coats the other vegetables in an incredible amount of flavor, then you have the steak seasoning on top. It’s just 100% awesome! Serve hot and enjoy. 🙂





Source link

5 Kitchen Tools I Can’t Live Without


It’s always been my philosophy to keep my kitchen equipment basic, with as few single-purpose tools and appliances as possible. But there are a few kitchen tools that go above and beyond. They’re multi-purpose items that are absolutely invaluable in my kitchen, and they get used almost every day. I want to share this short list of essential items with you because they’re a great place to start when you’re a beginner cook, and if you’re an experienced cook with tons of kitchen tools and gadgets, maybe this will help you simplify. 😉

If you want to read the full post about all of my kitchen equipment, check out Kitchen Basics – Tools and Equipment for a Well Equipped Kitchen

This post contains affiliate links to products I use and love. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Thumbnails of kitchen tools with article title overlay

P.S. I saved the best for last, so don’t skip the end! And make sure to share your most used, can’t-live-without kitchen tools in the comments below. Are you ready? Let’s dive right in!

1. Dutch Oven





Source link